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Monday, 28 October 2019 00:00

What Causes Morton’s Neuroma?

Patients who have pain and discomfort in between the third and fourth toes may have a condition that is referred to as Morton’s Neuroma. Additionally, pain can be felt on the on the ball of the foot, and under the toes. This condition is defined as a thickening of nerve tissue, and can cause a sharp, burning pain. A common reason why this ailment may develop can be connected to wearing high heels. This may be a result of not having ample room for the toes to move freely in. Moderate relief may be obtained if lower-heeled shoes are worn. If existing medical conditions are present such as hammertoes or bunions, the likelihood may increase for Morton’s neuroma to develop. After a diagnosis is performed, which typically includes having an X-ray, ultrasound, or MRI taken, the correct treatment process can begin. It is strongly advised to discuss your symptoms with a podiatrist who can offer you correct methods to manage this ailment.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. Henry Miller of New Jersey. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Freehold, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about What is Morton's Neuroma?
Tuesday, 22 October 2019 00:00

Hammertoe May Be Genetic

The toes that are typically affected by hammertoe are the second, third, or fourth toes. Patients who have family members that have this condition may be prone to developing it. It can also come from wearing shoes that do not fit properly, and have inadequate room for the toes to move freely in. This may cause the joints in the second toe to gradually cross over to the toe next to it, and can cause pain and discomfort. Additionally, it may become stiff, and surgery may be a necessary treatment option to have it permanently straightened. Patients sometimes develop a callus that can form on top of the affected toe. This can be a result of friction that comes from the toe rubbing against the shoe. Calluses may also develop on the sole of the foot, and this may happen from chronic stress the foot is under. If you are afflicted with hammertoe, it is advised that you seek the counsel of a podiatrist who can properly diagnosis and treat this condition.

Hammertoe

Hammertoes can be a painful condition to live with. For more information, contact Dr. Henry Miller from New Jersey. Our doctor will answer any of your foot- and ankle-related questions.

Hammertoe is a foot deformity that affects the joints of the second, third, fourth, or fifth toes of your feet. It is a painful foot condition in which these toes curl and arch up, which can often lead to pain when wearing footwear.

Symptoms

  • Pain in the affected toes
  • Development of corns or calluses due to friction
  • Inflammation
  • Redness
  • Contracture of the toes

Causes

Genetics – People who are genetically predisposed to hammertoe are often more susceptible

Arthritis – Because arthritis affects the joints in your toes, further deformities stemming from arthritis can occur

Trauma – Direct trauma to the toes could potentially lead to hammertoe

Ill-fitting shoes – Undue pressure on the front of the toes from ill-fitting shoes can potentially lead to the development of hammertoe

Treatment

Orthotics – Custom made inserts can be used to help relieve pressure placed on the toes and therefore relieve some of the pain associated with it

Medications – Oral medications such as anti-inflammatories or NSAIDs could be used to treat the pain and inflammation hammertoes causes. Injections of corticosteroids are also sometimes used

Surgery – In more severe cases where the hammertoes have become more rigid, foot surgery is a potential option

If you have any questions please contact our office located in Freehold, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What Are Hammertoes?
Monday, 14 October 2019 00:00

When Do Children Begin To Walk?

Babies feet are generally flexible when they are born. There are numerous bones, joints, and ligaments that hold the feet together, and will become stronger as walking begins. This typically happens between eight and eighteen months of age. Research has indicated it is beneficial to have your children walk barefoot while they are indoors. The overall strength of the foot may be developed as a result of the grasping action the toes will provide. When it is time to walk outside, wearing the proper footwear will help the child to balance as the feet become stronger. These shoes should consist of having soles that are flexible and flat, and it is recommended that there is adequate room for the toes to move freely in. If you notice your child’s feet are turning inward or outward, it is advised to schedule an appointment with a podiatrist who can properly assess your child’s feet.

The health of a child’s feet is vital to their overall well-being. If you have any questions regarding foot health, contact Dr. Henry Miller of New Jersey. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Tips for Keeping Children's Feet Healthy

  • Make sure their shoes fit properly
  • Look for any signs of in-toeing or out-toeing
  • Check to see if they have Clubfoot (condition that affects your child’s foot and ankle, twisting the heel and toes inward) which is one of the most common nonmajor birth defects.
  • Lightly cover your baby’s feet (Tight covers may keep your baby from moving their feet freely, and could prevent normal development)
  • Allow your toddler to go shoeless (Shoes can be restricting for a young child’s foot)
  • Cut toenails straight across to avoid ingrown toenails
  • Keep your child’s foot clean and dry
  • Cover cuts and scrapes. Wash any scratches with soap and water and cover them with a bandage until they’ve healed.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Freehold, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about What to Do to Keep Your Child’s Feet Healthy
Wednesday, 09 October 2019 00:00

Why Do Corns Develop?

A small, hardened portion of skin on top of the toe may be referred to as a corn. It may appear to be yellow, and can cause considerable pain while wearing shoes. They can also form in between the toes, and on the bottom of the feet. A common reason why corns can develop is a result of excess friction that may come from wearing shoes that do not fit correctly. Patients who are afflicted with corns may find moderate relief when the foot is soaked in warm water. This may help to soften the affected area, followed by filing with a pumice stone. If it is painful to complete daily activities, wearing a corn pad over the corn may provide adequate cushioning that is needed for temporary relief. If you have a corn on any part of your foot, it is advised that you seek the counsel of a podiatrist who can offer permanent treatment options.

If you have any concerns regarding your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Henry Miller of New Jersey. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? and How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns can be described as areas of the skin that have thickened to the point of becoming painful or irritating. They are often layers and layers of the skin that have become dry and rough, and are normally smaller than calluses.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as wearing:

  • Well-fitting socks
  • Comfortable shoes that are not tight around your foot
  • Shoes that offer support

Treating Corns
Treatment of corns involves removing the dead skin that has built up in the specific area of the foot. Consult with Our doctor to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Freehold, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Corns and Calluses
Saturday, 05 October 2019 00:00

Do your Child's Feet Hurt?

Have your child's feet been examined lately?

Tuesday, 01 October 2019 00:00

Signs a Wound is not Healing Properly

If you step on something that pierces the skin on the foot, it may be treated by applying a bandage or by using skin glue. An X-ray is often performed if the object is embedded in the sole of the foot, and surgery may be required to remove it. The wound will generally heal faster when it is kept clean and dry. After thoroughly washing the hands, the bandage should be removed, and the affected area washed with antibacterial soap and warm water. Many patients will notice if the wound is not healing properly. This can include redness and swelling, the edges of the wound may reopen, and it may be difficult to move the foot. If you would like additional information about how to care for a wound on the foot, it is suggested that you speak to a podiatrist.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Henry Miller from New Jersey. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Freehold, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
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